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Selling the Rugby World Cup

The Rugby World Cup has returned to New Zealand for the first time since the nation co-hosted the debut tournament 24 years ago. But New Zealand Rugby Union head, Steve Tew has already raised concerns about the financing behind the game and whether New Zealand can even afford to play in another World Cup. If we judge from a purely commercial standpoint, it might rationally be expected that New Zealand may be hosting the world cup for the last time, despite the success of the sport in the region.
 

Changing attitudes to the carbon tax

The mining industry, led by the Minerals Council of Australia, has written to members asking for funds to under take a new advertising campaign to attack the carbon tax.

In his letter to members, Minerals Council chief executive Mitch Hooke says that in current day Australia, major policy battles are fought and won in the media and that miners must spend accordingly.

So is Mitch Hooke right when he says the “new paradigm is one of public contest through the popular media more so than rational, effective, considered consultation and debate”?

Are doubts about consumer confidence justified?

Consumer confidence has fallen by 8.3% to its lowest level in two years, according to the Westpac-Melbourne Institute Consumer Sentiment Index.

The drop has been connected to speculation about the impact of the carbon tax, with Treasurer Wayne Swan calling on Opposition Leader Tony Abbott to “stop scaring the consumers”.

Retailer David Jones last night issued a dramatic profit downgrade, saying it expects second-half profits to be down by 9% to 12%. The company blamed the slowdown of sales on factors such as offshore Internet retailers due to the high Australian dollar, fears about the carbon tax and the impact of the flood levy.

Trust the market - why regulation won't stop carbon tax gouging

Trust the market – why regulation won’t stop carbon tax gouging

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Price-gouging might occur under the carbon tax regime, but market discipline will keep it in check. Flickr/dmcneil

Federal Treasurer Wayne Swan has announced that the government will provide the competition watchdog with almost $13 million in extra funding to tackle carbon tax-related price-gouging.

In this context, price-gouging refers to business inflating prices beyond the cost increases reasonably attributable to the tax.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s extra funding will go toward hiring a team of 20 staff dedicated to identify and investigate price-gouging.

Cyclists, Health, Anti Doping and Medical Monitoring A better approach?

Editorial Originally published by the The International Network of Humanistic Doping Research http://doping.au.dk/

Martin Hardie, Lecturer in Law, School of Law, Deakin University, Australia.

It is July and the Tour is upon us, and already the first week of racing, as is the norm, has been marred by a number of crashes that have seen big names withdraw from the race from one or another injury. Accidents and mass crashes have been, and always will be, a part of road cycling, and they probably are unavoidable with a large peloton of over 150 riders daily battling the elements.

Time for Green Marketing to rise to challenge on environment

It is surprising that the practice of marketing (and business strategy more generally) does not explicitly integrate and address the environmental problems and their impacts on mankind.

Yet by not doing so marketing practitioners are sowing the seeds of their own destruction. In the not so distant past businesses were quick to respond to less significant marketing-related problems.

For example, firms, consumers and governments spent hundreds of billions, if not trillions, of dollars dealing with the millennium bug, or Y2K problem.  As many will remember computer programs traditionally only had two digit codes for the year and could not adapt to changes associated with moving from the twentieth century to the twenty first century which required a four digit code for the year.

Should foreign investment rules be reviewed?

Should foreign investment rules be reviewed?

Concerns have been raised over the levels of foreign investment in Australia, including in the mining sector AAP.

The purchase of 43 farms in northern NSW by a state-controlled Chinese mining company has prompted calls this week for tougher restrictions on foreign investment.

Greens leader Bob Brown, independent Senator Nick Xenophon and Nationals Senator Barnaby Joyce have all called for a review of foreign investment rules.

Forget advertising, the problem is bigger than that

 Politics is a tricky business. Being in government is even trickier.

 

 

But it should be pretty simple. It’s like any other business, isn’t it? It’s all just marketing. You find out what they want, you tell them what you’re going to do, and then you give it to them.

 

So is it simply a case of “selling” yourself a bit better, as independent MP Andrew Wilkie posited last week on ABC Radio National?

 

If that is the case, what does the government need to do?

 

Ask any good salesperson the key to making a sale, and they will tell you that there are two parts to a successful sales pitch.

 

Making the sale

 

Is this the end of the 'annual' budget as we know it?

Events can occur that render forward estimates in budgets obsolete in a relatively short time frame.

Given the increasing emphasis on forward estimate figures in government budgets, it is timely to examine past budgets to determine their accuracy. Take the Commonwealth budget released three years ago in May 2008. That budget projected a surplus for each of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 financial years of approximately $19 billion. The budget released yesterday now projects these figures as deficits, not surpluses, amounting to $49.4 billion and $22.6 billion respectively. Hence, the total turnaround in the budget outcome for the two years 2010-11 and 2011-12, from that projected three years ago, amounts to $110 billion.

A Novel Romance

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend;
Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.
        Groucho Marx.

 

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