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Cyclists, Health, Anti Doping and Medical Monitoring A better approach?

Editorial Originally published by the The International Network of Humanistic Doping Research http://doping.au.dk/

Martin Hardie, Lecturer in Law, School of Law, Deakin University, Australia.

It is July and the Tour is upon us, and already the first week of racing, as is the norm, has been marred by a number of crashes that have seen big names withdraw from the race from one or another injury. Accidents and mass crashes have been, and always will be, a part of road cycling, and they probably are unavoidable with a large peloton of over 150 riders daily battling the elements.

Time for Green Marketing to rise to challenge on environment

It is surprising that the practice of marketing (and business strategy more generally) does not explicitly integrate and address the environmental problems and their impacts on mankind.

Yet by not doing so marketing practitioners are sowing the seeds of their own destruction. In the not so distant past businesses were quick to respond to less significant marketing-related problems.

For example, firms, consumers and governments spent hundreds of billions, if not trillions, of dollars dealing with the millennium bug, or Y2K problem.  As many will remember computer programs traditionally only had two digit codes for the year and could not adapt to changes associated with moving from the twentieth century to the twenty first century which required a four digit code for the year.

Should foreign investment rules be reviewed?

Should foreign investment rules be reviewed?

Concerns have been raised over the levels of foreign investment in Australia, including in the mining sector AAP.

The purchase of 43 farms in northern NSW by a state-controlled Chinese mining company has prompted calls this week for tougher restrictions on foreign investment.

Greens leader Bob Brown, independent Senator Nick Xenophon and Nationals Senator Barnaby Joyce have all called for a review of foreign investment rules.

Forget advertising, the problem is bigger than that

 Politics is a tricky business. Being in government is even trickier.

 

 

But it should be pretty simple. It’s like any other business, isn’t it? It’s all just marketing. You find out what they want, you tell them what you’re going to do, and then you give it to them.

 

So is it simply a case of “selling” yourself a bit better, as independent MP Andrew Wilkie posited last week on ABC Radio National?

 

If that is the case, what does the government need to do?

 

Ask any good salesperson the key to making a sale, and they will tell you that there are two parts to a successful sales pitch.

 

Making the sale

 

Is this the end of the 'annual' budget as we know it?

Events can occur that render forward estimates in budgets obsolete in a relatively short time frame.

Given the increasing emphasis on forward estimate figures in government budgets, it is timely to examine past budgets to determine their accuracy. Take the Commonwealth budget released three years ago in May 2008. That budget projected a surplus for each of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 financial years of approximately $19 billion. The budget released yesterday now projects these figures as deficits, not surpluses, amounting to $49.4 billion and $22.6 billion respectively. Hence, the total turnaround in the budget outcome for the two years 2010-11 and 2011-12, from that projected three years ago, amounts to $110 billion.

A Novel Romance

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend;
Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.
        Groucho Marx.

 

Cigarette brands and the plain truth

Cigarette packages have become the last bastion of advertising for cigarette manufacturers.

The new plain package cigarettes will be presented in olive green packaging, with the only visible logo a graphic health warning. The brand of the cigarette appears in plain type and small font.

Cigarette companies promote and sell through colours, logos and images. To this end, cigarette packets are designed to reassure smokers about risk and to reinforce smokers’ self-image.

Research has shown that changing the message, picture and colour of packaging has a significant influence over choice by younger consumers.

Importantly, the research showed that changing the size of the graphic warning picture, the size and number of brand elements, and the colour of the packaging has been linked to promoting cessation of smoking amongst young adult smokers.

For Sale - Why Australia's telecommunications model fails

 

 

Does anyone have a sense of déjà vu?

 

From mid 2007 to early 2009, the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman (TIO) received an increase in complaints from consumers of more than 40 per cent. More than a third of the complaints to the TIO were related to poor customer service or complaint handling experiences. As a result of this increase in dissatisfaction with service delivery, the then Ombudsman, Deirdre O’Donnell, implemented the “connect.resolve” campaign to encourage the telecommunications industry to “re-focus on customers and their experiences.” At the start of the campaign in 2009 the Ombudsman was receiving 20,000 cases at all levels each month. By early 2010, this number was still high, but had dropped to 16,500 per month.

 

The New Thrift or simply "Consumption Satiation"

 So, Christmas Eve wasn’t the saviour that the retailers expected. In conversations with retailers, it seems that even Christmas Eve sales were down. As one said to me, “This is the quietest Christmas Eve that I can remember.”

 

That said, it seems that grocery sales were up leading up to Christmas. Gluttony takes another form?

E-tailing and the end of bricks and mortar

 Are the days of the traditional bricks and mortar store numbered?

 

Probably not. What we do know is that the internet and online shopping has meant that consumers have access to more information, which is a good thing. At least for the near future (probably until we get flying cars and jetpacks), there will be people who will go to the bricks and mortar shops.

 

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