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The Sharks 'Offer' - another set back for anti doping's credibility in Australia

Current and former Cronulla Sutherland players have reluctantly decided to a put an end to their involvement in the ASADA case. They have done so after being placed in an untenable and unfair position by ASADA this week.

Firstly, all the players maintain that they have done nothing wrong and have not broken any anti-doping rules.

Secondly, according to the Full Federal Court the show cause notices issued by ASADA are no more than mere assertions of a possibility of a violation. There is simply not enough evidence upon which ASADA could prove its case at a final hearing before the NRL or the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

The NRL has stated privately that ASADA does not have enough evidence to win a case against the players.

The AFL's Indigenous Round and the innocent face of racism

Friday night’s AFL match between Collingwood and Sydney marked the opening of the code’s Indigenous Round. Yet the chance for the contribution of Indigenous footballers to the game – both past and present – to be recognised and celebrated was marred by a racial taunt from a young supporter at Sydney’s Indigenous star Adam Goodes.

The round of games aimed to recognise the contribution of Indigenous people and culture to the broader Australian society. While showcasing the unique talent and pride in culture of the Indigenous community, it simultaneously noted the struggle against racism that has accompanied the achievements of many Indigenous people in this country.

Pointing the Finger - who are the dopers who are the organised criminals?

As Spain’s Operacion Puerto trial neared the end of its second week, the Australian Crime Commission has released a report that exposes what it calls widespread doping in many Australian sports along with links to organized crime involved in the supply of doping products and match fixing. This report follows up the USADA Armstrong case and further exposes the lie peddled in the Anglo American world that doping in sport is something that only happens somewhere else, for example in European countries like Spain or in sports like cycling.
 

Selling the Rugby World Cup

The Rugby World Cup has returned to New Zealand for the first time since the nation co-hosted the debut tournament 24 years ago. But New Zealand Rugby Union head, Steve Tew has already raised concerns about the financing behind the game and whether New Zealand can even afford to play in another World Cup. If we judge from a purely commercial standpoint, it might rationally be expected that New Zealand may be hosting the world cup for the last time, despite the success of the sport in the region.
 

Cyclists, Health, Anti Doping and Medical Monitoring A better approach?

Editorial Originally published by the The International Network of Humanistic Doping Research http://doping.au.dk/

Martin Hardie, Lecturer in Law, School of Law, Deakin University, Australia.

It is July and the Tour is upon us, and already the first week of racing, as is the norm, has been marred by a number of crashes that have seen big names withdraw from the race from one or another injury. Accidents and mass crashes have been, and always will be, a part of road cycling, and they probably are unavoidable with a large peloton of over 150 riders daily battling the elements.

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