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Public commentary on a recent, critical UN report on East Timor's PM

A person who contributed to a discussion on East Timor recently wrote, regarding a leaked UN report that was critical of PM Xanana Gusmao’s increasing executive control of government:
“There is an eerie silence out there regarding the attacks contained in the UN report against the PM Gusmao from the many foreign academics, commentators and media who in 2006/07 vehemently condemned the FRETILIN Alkatiri first constitutional government for what they termed its anti-democratic, authoritarian, centralist, even Marxist practices and policies. Why is this so? Perhaps now that their preferred Timorese PM who is not a member of FRETILIN is in power they do not want to help draw attention to perceived or otherwise weaknesses.

Shall we talk about whales and whaling? (6)

Sushi, Sukiyaki and Skyhooks

When I first read an email from Sandra, our media person, saying “Abc radio 774 red symons would like to interview you re your blog and latest post”, my mind spun into two totally different directions.  I immediately thought, “Me?  On air?  Nah ….”  Although it was an honour to get such an offer from the ABC Melbourne’s breakfast show, I thought I wasn’t ready for that yet.  The whaling dispute is a complex issue.  How could I make my point in a short interview?  Do I have enough and accurate information to speak about the dispute to the public?  In addition, I had to do it in English, of course.  I felt it was a bit risky.

It's life, Jim, but not as we know it, Part One

 

Despite a clear and substantial increase in the amount and quality of information available to the modern consumer through globalisation, and communication advances, we still don’t always make decisions that are in our best interests, particularly in the areas where politicians and lawyers seem to spend a lot of time, such as financial, telecommunications, and even competition policy. So what can policy makers do to at least create an environment of better consumer outcomes?

Osama bin Laden: What Indonesia told the US but the US did not tell Indonesia, or anyone else

The world of intelligence – spying to you and me – is by definition shrouded in secrecy, so that often what we know is limited or partial and the rest is, hopefully, what makes sense based on building up a longer term picture of events. The question of who knew what and how that was handled in the tracking of Osama bin Laden is a case in point.

It is known that the US had been tracking Osama bin Laden closely for the last few years, had known where his hideout was since last August and had been planning how to neutralise him since that time. We also know that massive bombs were considered as one option, but that a highly detailed raid by two units of special forces operatives was chosen instead.

Shall we talk about whales and whaling? (5)

Whales and geisha girls

 

Whether or not whaling and eating whale meat is a genuine part of Japanese culture is one of the hottest points of debate between a pro-whaling camp and an anti-whaling camp.  The former claims that whaling and whale-eating culture has existed in Japan since the ancient time and is, therefore, a part of Japanese culture.  

 

     On the other hand, the anti-whaling camp asserts that Japan’s cultural claim is a fraud, as whale meat consumption is not a nationwide practice and there are a lot of Japanese who have never eaten the meat.  Pointing to whaling, they insist, specifically referring to the Japanese scientific research whaling in the Antarctic, that the pelagic whaling with big ships and sophisticated equipments is a modern practice and not at all traditional.

 

Australia's asylum seeker policy dying a death of a thousand cuts

The Australian government’s ‘East Timor’ asylum seeker solution is dying a death of a thousand cuts. It is a slow and painful process and unedifying to watch it writhe in agony. The plan has not yet been killed outright, but only an unreconstructed optimist would now suggest its fate is other than sealed.

 

The Bali Process ministerial forum has been one of the more damaging cuts to the ‘East Timor solution’, even if the decision by East Timor Foreign Minister Zacarias da Costa not to attend was not a snub to Australia, as presented by some. Rather, East Timor has correctly pointed out that it has much more pressing priorities than Australia’s domestic concerns with asylum seekers and its half-baked plan about where to process them.

 

Shall we talk about whales and whaling? (4)

Japan March 11th 2011: For the record

 

In the evening of 22 March, I boarded Qantas flight 22 bound for Sydney via Hong Kong from Narita International Airport.  It was a familiar flight for me which was usually a direct flight between Tokyo and Sydney.  However, the flight route of the QF22 had been changed due to the disaster in Japan.  Qantas wanted to make sure the safety of their crews.

 

Although I was unhappy and slightly anxious about the change of the route, the flight turn out to be the most memorable and, maybe, the safest flight I have ever had.  72 crew members of the Australian rescue team returning to Australia from the disaster zone were on board.

 

Shall we talk about whales and whaling? (3)

What to eat and what not to

 

The most frequently asked question to me while talking with my friends here in Australia about the whaling dispute is “have you eaten whale meat?’  “What it’s like?” they ask.  They all look very curious about the ‘mysterious’ and ‘exotic’ meat.  

     I once heard a rumour that restaurants in Japan which serve whale meat had recently been flocked by Australian tourists.  Don’t worry.  It is just a rumour.  And, no.  I have not made a thorough investigation into this rumour as yet.  But Australians are adventurous, brave and open to unknown cultures.  Then, why not?  

Idle Hands, Devil’s Work: St Kilda FC and their Problem with Early Career Players

In the past few months the St Kilda FC has been struggling to manage a number of highly publicised incidents involving its players – early career and senior. Following an incident at a training camp in Queenstown (NZ) St Kilda suspended four of its players (three of whom were just beginning their AFL careers) for six weeks and told them to get a ‘real job’. Officials at the Club said that these young men had too much money and too much time on their hands, and this explained why they got into trouble (mixing alcohol and sleeping pills and breaking ‘team rules’).
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